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How does Your X chromosome Compare to Your Siblings?

How does Your X chromosome Compare to Your Siblings?



In the final video in this DNA series about your relationships, Andy talks about your siblings, and how your X chromosome(s) compare to them.

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8 thoughts on “How does Your X chromosome Compare to Your Siblings?

  1. Glad I found your channel. I’m trying to understand the graph for my Gedmatch account result. Specific to a probable half sister same father. By your video the entire X bar should be a solid blue confirming we share same father. I also have a first cousin on mother’s side that has 1553 cM across 55 segments. I’m 99.9% sure my father isn’t hers. Could this high cM be due to our mothers as sisters shared so much of the same mitochondrial dna? Thank you for providing such clear explanations to those of not in field of genetic study.

  2. Am I correct in guessing that my half sister (same father) is genetically a smidge closer to be in terms of DNA than she is to her other half sister (same mother)? I realize this is not just about the X chromosomes… um, I think.

  3. My full sister Rhonda,according to the 23&Me DNA test shares 48.6% of my DNA.I wonder if she had been born a male instead of a female,would that probably make her DNA sharing with her exactly 50%,or perhaps even a little higher?Because,if she had been born a male,then she would be XY just like me,sharing the male Y chromosome with me,in contrast to the XX chromosome pattern of females.Am I correct?

  4. Question for you. My son's father was adopted and I'm trying to locate the paternal grandparents of my son based on an autosomal test – (approx. a 3rd cousin, 108 cM shared DNA match). This cousin and his grandfather also resemble the father of my son quite a bit, it's uncanny. The grandfather of the cousin had only 3 brothers and I suspect one of these brothers is the great grandfather of my son. Is it possible to determine anything more without doing an actual Y DNA test? I mean I know based on geography that this cousin is not related to me, so it has to be from the father's side and not passed through X Dna. I hope I am talking sense.

  5. Hi, I don't know if you remember me. I commented on a previous video by saying that this lady is coming as my first cousin on 23andMe, and as my dad's half sister. Specifically, it says that my dad & this lady have 22.9% of the same DNA and it shows on his chromosomes what DNA segments they have in common (it was nearly every chromosome, even if there was just a small location) One chromosome was entirely half-shared, in fact. What is the probability that they are half siblings? I remember you saying that technically it's possible but really improbable to inherit so much DNA from a distant relative, and that it's more probable that she is my half aunt that I never knew about. I'm writing this because I just found out now what the exact percentage DNA similarly is. It's just that as far as I knew this situation would be impossible

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